adapted from a design by George Bain based on the Book of Kells home Programme Bookings Shop The Wuffings .
Wuffing Education
 

Cnut and the Waveney

Cnut

with Dr Lucy Marten & Dr Sam Newton

at Tranmer House, Sutton Hoo (map)
on Saturday 18th November 2006

A new history of the East Anglian landscape in the light of the recent research which suggests that the old kingdom was reshaped into the shires of Norfolk and Suffolk by King Cnut [1016-1035].

Provisional Programme
  10.00 Coffee on arrival  
  10.15 The Shaping of the Kingdom of the Eastern Angles.
An exploration charting what we can see of the formation and history of the independent kingdom of the Eastern Angles up to the coming of Edward the Elder in 917.
 
  11.15 Coffee  
  11.30 Danes and West Saxons 917-1016.
An examination of the history of East Anglia during the tenth and early eleventh centuries, beginning with a close look at the year 917, when King Edward the Elder is supposed to have ‘stormed through East Anglia’. We shall also assess the extant charter evidence and ask just how integrated into the polity of England this region really was. This session will finish with the reign of Ethelred II ('Unraed') and the impact of yet more Danish raids and invasions.
 
  12.30 Lunch break  
  14:00 The Shiring of East Anglia 1016-1066
A consideration of new evidence that the process of dividing the old kingdom into the counties or shires of Norfolk and Suffolk did not take place until the 1020s - a full century after the date generally accepted. The role of King Cnut and Queen Emma in East Anglia will be investigated and the question of why the process of shiring was important will be addressed. Queen Emma’s role in the region has not hitherto been explored, but it is possible to trace her patronage in the careers of powerful individuals from the reign of her son Edward the Confessor.
 
  15:00 Tea break  
  15:15 North Folk and South Folk
A reassessment of East Anglian Landscape History in the light of the implications of the foregoing sessions, testing them against earlier views. These include the theory that the territory of the Liberty of St Edmund was formed in the seventh century.
 
  16:15 Close  

About the Speakers

About Dr Lucy Marten
Having successfully completed her doctoral thesis on ‘Land and Lordship in Tenth and Eleventh-Century Suffolk’, Lucy now holds a British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the University of East Anglia to study the writing of Domesday Book and is also working on a book covering this period of Suffolk’s history.

About Dr Sam Newton
Sam Newton was awarded his Ph.D in 1991 and published his first book, The Origins of Beowulf and the pre-Viking Kingdom of East Anglia, in 1993. Since then he has been working as an independent scholar in Early Medieval Studies. His latest book, The Reckoning of King Rædwald, was published in 2003. He is also now a Director of Wuffing Education, NADFAS lecturer, and Time Team historian.

Some suggestions for further reading
(useful but not essential)

Ashwin & Davison (eds), An Historical Atlas of Norfolk (Phillimore 2005).
Dymond & Martin (eds), An Historical Atlas of Suffolk, 3rd ed. (Suffolk 1999)
Fairclough, J. & M Hardy, Thornham and the Waveney Valley. An historic landscape explored (Heritage 2004).
Rumble, A. [ed.], Domesday Book, Suffolk, 2 vols (Chichester 1986).
Swanton, M., The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (Phoenix 2000).
Warner, P., The Origins of Suffolk (Manchester, 1996).
Williamson, T., The Origins of Norfolk (Manchester, 1993).

Bookings

Please phone or email to check the availability of places and then send the application form and a cheque for £38, payable to Wuffing Education to:

Wuffing Education,
4 Hilly Fields,
Woodbridge, Suffolk IP12 4DX
(tel : 01394 386498)

Email cliff AT wuffingeducation.co.uk
(replace 'AT' by '@' in order to send email - we used 'AT' to avoid spam robots automatically sending us emails)
Website www.wuffingeducation.co.uk

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We have learnt of the fame of the Wuffing folk-lords of long ago, of how those wolf-kings held the ancestral land of East Anglia....
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